Diamond Tooth Taxidermy

Exquisite Taxidermy Art and Design

© 2013 Diamond Tooth Taxidermy
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About Beth Beverly


I am a State and Federally licensed taxidermist who graduated from the Pocono Institute of Taxidermy in 2010 with high marks. I have a deep respect for this craft and those who strive to preserve it.

It is my pleasure to work on any trophy mount, be it a shoulder, life-size, rug, or fish.

I accept custom orders for fantasy mounts, wearables, and bridal hair pieces.

Sculptural mounts and hats are available for rental provided they are in stock at time of inquiry.

Contact me describing your wish and I will be delighted to make it so.


Diamond Tooth Taxidermy Blog:



Twenty4Twenty #5 & #6: Duncan Trussell and Natasha Leggero

Friday night I made an impromptu trip up to NYC to see two of my favorite comedians in the whole world perform.  I found out about Duncan Trussell via the Joe Rogan Podcast which led me to the Lavender Hour podcast where I learned about the amazing Natasha Leggero.  I get all of my outside world info through podcasts; its impressive how much of the medium I take in every week.  Anyway, Lavender Hour IMMEDIATELY  became my number one audio obsession.  Usually when I discover a new podcast, there are a few month's worth of backlog for me to indulge myself with but I caught the Lavender Hour just a couple weeks into its existence, leaving me refreshing my podcast tab on iTunes every day like a slobbering maniac.



It's that good.



Sure, the quality and sound levels were awful.  AWFUL.  They still leave something to be desired.  But who the fuck cares, the gems, the pearls just dripping from the mouths of these two are so rich with depth, humor and wit that I'd even listen to one of them chew food into the mic just to hear what they have to say.  Please, listen for yourself.  My little words can barely do it justice.  I recommend Air France Man as an excellent Lavender Hour cherry popper.



Needless to say, these two have been on my Twenty4Twenty list since the start.  I've tweeted at them, sent Facebook messages, emailed them via their respective sites, and gotten nothing.  I mean, they're kind of famous.  Which means they're kind of busy.  Busy with all the shit that goes along with being a personality, whatever that may be.  I hope someday I know it.  Intimately.



So when my gal pal Carmen suggested we take a little jaunt up to see them perform at Carolines comedy club, I was ecstatic.  Duh.  Of course we'll meet them after the show and I can hand them their Twenty4Twenty gifts in person.  But would it be creepy?  Eh.  And was there time?  I figured I would just whip something up for them and then feel it out.



First up: a hair ornament for Natasha.  Looking at it now, I cringe.  I had no time.  I made it so fast, and it doesn't reflect my true skill level/ attention to detail. But it's still pretty cool.  I used a hand carved bone comb dyed red, and embellished it with THREE taxidermied bird wings.  Plus diamonds.  Lots of diamonds, as a nod to her material.  The added feathers are from pheasant and guinea.







I just can't help but wish I had more time.  And more knowledge.  Judging from her photos, I guessed that she had a full head of thick, luxurious hair.  I mean, shes undeniably gorgeous:







And a girl after my own heart, judging by that outfit.







So that's Natasha's comb.  I was going to make Duncan a set of cufflinks, based on a rant he went on recently (on the podcast, obviously) about making an effort to dress well more often as a protest of the general American Malaise in regard to fashion.  But last-minute (thanks Jim!) I went in a different direction and made him a personal rooster claw voodoo charm, which I embellished with vintage gems.











SO.  We chanted our way through the Lincoln Tunnel Friday night traffic and made it to the venue just as the MC was starting the show.  We were seated practically on the fucking stage and I was sweating bullets.  It's a strange feeling, seeing someone you've been a fan of for so long in person, on stage, performing.  I get nervous for them.  Please don't fuck up.  Don't let me down.  Live up to my impossible expectations.



And they did.  Both sets were great, all great, great, great, great.  We filed out after the show and saw Duncan and Natasha out in the lobby but I had to pee so bad that we couldn't say hi right away.  Plus I had to check my look.  I'd been laughing so hard for so long that my lipstick surely had run.   OK.  Here we go.



Why is such a big deal to meet people you admire?  I'm really interested in this fan/star dynamic.  I mean, they both are clearly people I can relate to and seem as intelligent/creative/ kind as my friends.  But because they're in this industry which exposes them to so many people, they've acquired this kind of mythic status which separates them from me.  From us.  It's like a grander scale of wanting to be in the orbit as the cool girls in high school, except the people I choose to admire as an adult are way, way, cooler.



But I'm cool too.  I'm extremely cool.  So why do I turn into a googly-eyed fan girl in the presence of these folks?  Worth exploring, I suppose.  I just hope they're flattered.  And that they remember the two Purple Popes who came all the way up from Philly to see them work their magic.



We were so enthralled after it all that we couldn't resist doing a turn in times square:







 







 



You're gonna make it after all, indeed.

Triumphant!

I have returned from Brooklyn a winner...in so many ways.  The entire two day experience was a blast, the crowning moment obviously being when I was presented the title "Best in Show" at the Carnivorous Nights taxidermy contest.  The evening was a cavalcade of awesome, however, beginning with arriving at the venue and peeking at the other entries.  I felt very timid and nervous, not having any idea how this whole thing was to go down, and lying on the presentation table backstage were some pieces that I would embarrassingly refer to many times that night as "stiff competition".  (Could've been the one too many cocktails to steel my nerves or my complete lack of wit, take your pick).



Melissa Milgrom, author of Still life, adventures in taxidermy, opened up the evening with a brief chat and I was hanging on her every word.  Even though I'd read the book and all that she described was somewhate familliar to me, I always admire a decent public speaker.



Mike Zohn, host of Discovery Channel's new show "Oddities" was the key-note speaker and I loathe to admit that his speech was lost on me because at that point my nerves were starting to get the best of me.  My hands were shaking and I was trying to go over my presentation in my head while fighting off the near-crippling fear that I would say something stupid. Thankfully I was seated next to my dear friend Thea who brought her recording equipment and was producing a piece about the event.  I look forward to listening to her material so I can refresh myself on what I may have missed. Behind me was Daisy Tainton, who I traded quips with throughout the evening.  She specialises in insects and snark.  Seriously, her presentation has me spraying red wine out my nose.  In fact, I found most of the contestants to be quick with a joke and very humorous.  I, on the other hand, was possibly just the right combination of awkward, sad and sweet.



Here I am describing my first entry, Elke 2.0.  She was the beloved rat terrier to a local Philadelphia family for 14 years before she passed recently in her sleep.  I spoke of getting the call from a friend about the friend I was about to meet, and my trepidatious handling of the manner.  Basically what I tried to convey (and I believe reached everyone present) is my undying, unconditional love for animals and my goal to treat them with utmost respect after death. It was slightly emotional.







 



Next to Elke 2.0 is Grazyana, a Polish hen which belonged to another friend of mine.   I buy fresh eggs from him whenever they're available and this little gal didn't make it to laying age.  She was petite and so special; I imagined her as a Princess Bride.







 



On my head is a piece composed of a Selama hen, also a donation from my chicken master pal.  I basically mounted her in a position which would hug her to my scalp, with a wing fashionablly covering one side.  Lately I've been inspired by the beauty of feathers and how the dermis can be manipulated into different positions which accentuate this natural beauty.  I'm enjoying the attempt to mount creatures in ways that would not be found in nature.







 



 



Winner!  I went out to celebrate with my gracious hosts that night and celebrated until 3am.  I woke up exhausted but still elated.  Thankfully that elation stayed with me, through my ten block walk down 7th ave (after getting dropped off at Penn Station instead of 42nd street) while clutching a giant trophy and 3 foot long box of taxidermy sculpture, as well as my navigation of the Broad Street line and subsequent walk home from the station.







There were several impressive write-ups covering the event including a piece in the NY Times, and the Wall Street JournalDrew Anthony Smith is a photographer I met who took some really terrific pictures of the event several blogs covered the night's festivities quite nicely.  I suggest reading these (Love Train for the Tenebrous Empire, Pink Slip, Stars and Garters, Big Bad Bald Bastard, to name a few) for more coverage on the other contestants since every entry was fantastic and I'm only telling my own story here.

What are you, trying to be humane?





That is a very tiny picture of me shooting a firearm for my first time.  Another phase in the progression of me becoming a hunter, in small increments.



My friend Larry at The Firing Line in South Philadelphia was gracious enough to host myself and some friends the other evening for a shooting lesson. Some of us had handled guns before, some (me) had not.  I think I did OK for my first time; it's much more difficult that I'd imagined.  So many things to think about at once-I felt somewhat overwhelmed.    I'm comforted by recalling how intimidated I was by driving a car a first though, with that same inundated-with-information feeling, and years later I am one of the best drivers I know.  These things just take time.



That said, I think I did OK.  We shot with a very simple handgun first; at least I hit the target.  Then we moved onto a rifle, which I liked because the long barrel made aiming easier.  It was also very unthreatening: quiet, no recoil, and a simple single bullet load.  Plus it felt very marching bandy.  We then moved onto revolvers, which was like throwing fire right out of my hands.  A little more intense than I'd prefer but one had laser sights which made hitting the target a snap.  I was trying not to "kill" my cartoon robber-guy, so I shot his shoulder and hand.  I thought this was very thoughtful, but all I got was a couple chuckles from the peanut gallery.







While our group of noobs was in our little stall with Larry, there were guys coming and going, getting some shooting in after work-a sort of happy hour, I suppose.  I was initially shocked at how loud the shots were.  It took an hour or so to shake off the unnerving feeling of being surrounded by so much potential killing power.  I mean, maybe this is just because I'm so new to this but it felt like walking into that place was the ultimate excercise in trust of the sanity of strangers.  What if one of those guys just snapped and aimed his gun at someone else?  What if one of us just ran out into the range?  This wouldn't be the first time I've had morbid thoughts like this...sometimes I'm just astounded by the fact that society works.  People just...behave.  Driving on a highway, anyone could lose it and start a fifty car pile-up.  But we all keep the wheel straight and go with the flow.  And we trust that everyone else will do the same.  When I was a child in class, I used to fantasize about what would happen if someone jumped out of their desk and ran up to the teacher and punched him.  Or screamed an obscenity at the top of their lungs.  Or jumped out the window.  Perhaps I've got a touch of insanity bubbling just beneath the surface and I understand that I have to follow the rules to exist in this world, perhaps I was bored and yearning for something to break the monotony of my days.  Or maybe we're all like this and have that ingrained sense of carnal, unpredictable self buried in our psyche but the knowledge that we all are connected and what's trouble for one is trouble for all.



And then there's always the few poor SOBs that actually do snap.  Not me though: I love my life, I love my people, and I love the world too much.



So shooting.  I enjoyed it.  I want to do it again.  But what I really need to focus on is practicing my bow.  That's the next step. Soon enough...
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