Diamond Tooth Taxidermy

Exquisite Taxidermy Art and Design

© 2013 Diamond Tooth Taxidermy
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About Beth Beverly


I am a State and Federally licensed taxidermist who graduated from the Pocono Institute of Taxidermy in 2010 with high marks. I have a deep respect for this craft and those who strive to preserve it.

It is my pleasure to work on any trophy mount, be it a shoulder, life-size, rug, or fish.

I accept custom orders for fantasy mounts, wearables, and bridal hair pieces.

Sculptural mounts and hats are available for rental provided they are in stock at time of inquiry.

Contact me describing your wish and I will be delighted to make it so.


Diamond Tooth Taxidermy Blog:



Fur Lovers, this one is furrrrr EWE.


Meet Kifli the cat, she is the mascot to my Transylvania life.  Here she is pulling her best calendar kitty pose amongst a bed of sheep and rabbit furs.


In the last 15 months my life has taken me into a direction leading to all things Hungarian.  This can be traced to the Hungarian man I met and fell head over heels in love with who lives in a small city near Brasov in Transylvania.  It's technically in Romania but for all intents and purposes the people, animals, and culture I am discussing here are strictly Hungarian.  
When driving around over there it's impossible not to see herds of sheep from the road.  Shepherds and the flocks they maintain are a major part of the culture and traditions in Transylvania.  Sheep are raised for meat, cheese and fiber products; many villagers, during the Spring and Summer months, will send their sheep off with professional herders who tend to them and take them over vast green spaces to graze.  The villagers know that their animals are well cared for and when the shepherds bring them back they also get some cheese!  
I'm oversimplifying this two way relationship and how beneficial it is to all parties involved, including the land.  To read more, check out this very elegantly worded piece written by Paul White on his website Wild Transylvania: Walking with Shepherds.


The man who brought me to this enchanting part of the world has familial ties to sheep keepers, butchers, and even the tanners.  Through my visits with him I've gotten to see (as well as smell, touch and taste!) parts of this full circle first hand.  Here are some hides I brought back from my last trip:



Now let me back up to my trip.  Here is the view from the courtyard at the tannery.  It's run by a family near Brasov and they live on the premises which are deceptively sprawling.



One of the hide rooms. This guy is busy.  Cows, wild boars, sheep, goats, rabbits, all byproducts of food sourcing.  


More hides.  You may notice some non traditional game furs here and there, like fox and mink, beaver, etc.  I'm honestly not sure if those specimen are used for food or not (in the U.S. it's frowned upon to eat some of these critters but I know in parts of the world fox meat is completely acceptable) so I am choosing to focus on the sheep, as this is what I have become somewhat intimate and familiar with.


Part of the tannery serves as a sewing and crafting studio for manufacturing hats and garments.  As you will see, sheepskins are ubiquitous in this part of the world, and for good reason:it gets really, really cold in Transylvania.  Therefore sheepskins are on car seats, work seats, beds, floors next to beds, couches, basically anything you put your butt on.  And they work!  I am amazed at the heat one hide can generate when sat upon.   This is also why they make such good hats and coats.



Another sewing machine in his studio, also with a seat covered in sheepskin.  You may notice there is no shortage of appreciation for the female form here.  



Hat blocks for days.  A multidisciplinary Renaissance man, this one.



Some examples of his millinery craftsmanship:


Shop cats:



A leather sewing machine, the type which I have been coveting since my first trip over there last year.  These heavy little wizards make joining fur and leather into tidy little seams a snap.  



Needless to say, I have been completely overwhelmed with inspiration and the timing couldn't be more ideal as I've been wanting to take my craft, and Diamond Tooth, into a more luxury fur goods direction.  While I've stepped back somewhat from all the taxidermy I was once so immersed in I've had time to recalibrate my thoughts on what part of creating brings me pleasure, and I'm exploring the joys of tactile art.  I love working with materials that are nice to touch and have always been intoxicated by the feeling of fur on my skin.  Perhaps this is the time to explore more luxury home goods pieces, along with the couture hats, bags and wearables I have made my mark with.    All this is to say I brought home an entire suitcase full of fur and have listed a few for sale on my Etsy page.  I am also going to create a queen sized bed set (bed spread and two pillows) out of sheepskin and see what kind of interest it generates.  Stay tuned!













 For now, if you're keen on having a piece of an age old Hungarian tradition in your own home, please don't hesitate to check out these items I've listed for sale now, like this lush black hide:
Black Tsigai Sheep on Etsy






Or this soft as a cloud Butter Pecan Hide:


 Maybe Chocolate Spots suit your home better:


 Perhaps a small Oreo Crumble hide for your child's bed:






 Try not to take your clothes off and roll around on this cream and coffee spotted hide:



These last two hides aren't for sale; they were gifted to me by my new in-laws and may be subject to future colorant experimentation!



 If solid creamy white is your preference, I got you covered there too:




Happy grazing!



Some New SHeep Hoof Candle Holders



I just shot this fresh batch of sheep hoof candle holders yesterday; I'll be listing on etsy later this morning. 


I call this pair the dancers.  I experimented with posing and got as close to an on pointe stance as I could.  The bases and candle cups are pieces harvested from antique silver candle holders.

Evoking a ballet costume, I needed sequins or some sort of flash.  I used these hand beaded patches on the back to conceal what isn't the prettiest part of a sheep's hoof.  Kind of like a dancer's worn and beaten feet, I suppose.




This single piece is slated to be a gift for someone as part of my ongoing twenty4twenty project; I'll write more about it and its recipient after sending


I wanted something to suggest a beautiful woman, and for some reason this glass beaded fringe loosely wrapped and dripping me down the side reminded me of a goddess draped effortlessly in a flowing robe.


I wanted some of the beads to trail behind like a gown, which isn't necessarily safe for something with a flame on top of it but thankfully there will only be civilized adults where this piece is going-no children.




Here are my Moroccan Dancers.  I've never been to Morocco but it's on my list of dream visits, as I am endlessly inspired by the colors, dress, style, food, houses, everything I see from there. 


I used antique brass hand cups and bibeches with a pair of inverted antique glass bibeches with what appears to be hand made glass beading.  SO much provenance in these pieces.





I can practically see them shimmying.  Can you?











Here's my little Cossack hat candle holder.  He's a simple one, standing alone with his slim figure and poofy top.  He'll stand guard over your most intimate evenings, the ones where you spill all your guts onto the table.










 


Here is a pair of goat hoof candle holders I made about a year ago; they're one of the first pairs I constructed, and I consider them prototypes in a way.  You can see they have a slightly awkward standing angle and require museum wax to safely hold a candle and remain in grounded to the table.  I have since then developed new techniques in how I mount the hooves to rectify this.
They have recently come back to me after being part of a several months long exhibit at the Ward Museum in Maryland, and have also shown at Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction.  I just now got around to photographing them.  I don't have much else to say other then they are for sale, and I am have about four other pairs in the works.
Enjoy!











ORKA


 http://thefarmershusband.files.wordpress.com/2013/04/img_0815.jpg


This is Orka, the beloved sheep of my dear friends Bailey and Thomas who write on the blog The Farmer's Husband. 
She passed away during a complicated pregnancy; you can read all about it here.
If you are at all familiar with me or my work, you know I source almost all my specimen from this farm.  They take their work very seriously, just as I do, and do their best to be sure all their animals travel through life and death with the dignity and respect they deserve.

This past weekend my two favorite farmers in the whole world got married, and as a gift I mounted Orka for them.  Here's her horns on the sheep form I got from Mckenzie's:

Since she had to be put down via shotgun shot to the head, there were some realignment issues when it came to anchoring the horns to the form.  I did my best.  There were also some alterations I had to make since this is the form of a different breed of sheep.

 

That's what skin looks like when it's initially put over the form, in case you are not a taxidermist and were wondering.


And this is what it looks like after the skin is lined up, stapled, sewn, pinned, poked and coaxed into place.  Taxied, if you will, hence the term "taxidermy".


And now I'm feeling the rush of cold blood coursing through my head and down to my fingertips as I realise I have been spelling this creature's name wrong THE ENTIRE TIME. So that there above is her name, misspelled.    My husband Jim sanded and stained two pieces of reclaimed wood with a walnut ink he made himself from black walnuts.  He also did the hand painted lettering of her name.  I told him to spell it that way.
I am so mortified.


I included a plaid woven scarf since her head was cut off a bit close to the face and I wanted to have a long neck coming out from the plaque.  Also, it just looks really nice.
My apologies for the not so well lit and scant photos; we took them at an ungodly hour in the morning before hitting the road to get up to the farm for wedding prep.  This is why I should never rush.  It just doesn't suit me, my work or the choices I make.


But Orka's a good looking girl.  I'm happy with her, as were the grooms.  I'll get more photos the next time I visit, and maybe Jim can turn that C into a K.




Hoof It











A taxidermy calf hoof bows as deeply as possibly to present light to whomever wishes to receive it. A simple an elegant gesture, this piece will add allure to any table scape or bathtub meditation.
Solid and sturdy build that will last through many candles and memorable evenings.




Calf Hoof Candle Holders, Pair:







Contemplate the future while gazing into this glass orb poised atop a preserved calf hoof. Keep this piece in a sunlit room to see the light refract in the loveliest ways.
Stands on its own, this is a solid piece that will stand the test of suns, moons, spells and dreams.









Two elegant and eternally youthful legs dangle from a gold chain, eternally entwined in playful pose with one another.
Can be worm as a necklace or hung up as decor, dangled from a rearview mirror and anywhere you want to look at something sweet and tender and beautiful.








Sort out the fine print with this elegant magnifying glass and be sure to take in every detail of the contract before you. Or look for stray hairs and other clues to whatever modern day mystery confounds you.
A solid and sturdy piece that will stand the test of many a query, while enhancing your mystique cred at the same time.





Orca was a much beloved sheep living on the Bearded Lady Farm in upstate New York. Sadly, she perished while giving birth due to complications. One her miracle offspring lives on however, and Orca's spirit also lives on in the light cast from the glow of candle burning in this pair of holders fashioned from her back hooves.
These are delicate and while they stand on their own, it is recommended to secure them with a dab of museum wax on the bottom as they are sensitive to hips bumping into the table and strong vibrations from feet stomping on the floor.
Viva Orca!




Mouse & Rat Fetus Ornament:
I made a limited run of a dozen or so of these Christmas ornament snowglobes with tiny fetuses inside.  They're selling too fast to bother listing on Etsy so I'll just share them here.  If you'd like to place an order, there are a couple left so please email diamondtoothtaxidermist@gmail.com to claim one.


It's heart breaking to open up a specimen and find that she was carrying a little family inside of her, and I don't take those moments lightly.  I've held onto my petite "nursery" for a few years now, and I want the little guys to go out and experience the world.

I hope they can bring some cheer to a few warm and fuzzy hearts.





BORROWED POST: THE FARMER'S HUSBAND, BABY PARADE

Get ready to gasp and ooh and ahh.  These are the cutest photos you will see all week.  All currently happening at the Farmer's Husband!

 

 

Baby parade 2013

April 24, 2013

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Deloris, the Guernsey x Toggenburg doe kid.
Sorry you haven’t heard from us much lately. We don’t have internet access at our new farm yet, and we’ve had lots of babies to squeeze. Lots and lots of babies. To date, our gals have produced 26 lambs and kids. Here is a photo list of who’s given birth to what on the farm this year. We will update as more kids hit the ground to help us keep them all straight, and to provide some cute babies for you to enjoy.
Goats
March 15, 2013, Gertie the Toggenburg doe gave birth to twin girls, sired by the Guernsey buck, Brady. Dolly, is a flaxen blond color and polled, and Deloris is a dark Sundgau color with gold markings and is disbudded.
Dolly and Deloris, Guernsey x Toggenburg goat kids. Born March 8, 2013.
Dolly and Deloris, Guernsey x Toggenburg goat kids. Born March 8, 2013.
March 24, 2013, Esther the Toggenburg doe had triplet girls. Dottie is a dark Sundgau pattern, with gold marking, and a white spot on her head, and is polled. Daisy is almost white with a bit of blond, and is disbudded. Daphne is almost white as well with a touch of gold, and is disbudded.
Daphne, Daisy, and Dottie Guernsey x Toggenburg triplets
March 31 (Easter day), Trixie the Sable Saanen doe had one boy and one girl. The boy was sold shortly after birth. The girl, Dixie, is very light blond in color, and is polled.
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photo-5
April 3, 2013, Bramble the Guernsey (well mostly Guernsey) doe produced a boy and a girl, from Brady, the Guernsey buck. Dick is blond at the head, fading to red at the haunches, and is disbudded. Dorcas is solid ginger red from head to tail, and is polled.
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Dorcas and Dick, British Guernsey goat kids
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Dick and Dorcas, offspring of Brady and Bramble.
April 5, Banbury the Guernsey (HB2) doe had twin boys, from Brady, the Guernsey buck. Dudley is an even blond with small white spots on his face, and is disbudded.  Dexter is an even ginger red with white spotting on his face, and is polled.
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Dudley, the British Guernsey buckling
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Dexter, the British Guernsey buckling
April 6, 2013, Vapors, the Sable Saanen doe had twin boys. They were sold a few days later for pets/meat. They were both white.
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Vapors and boys.
April 9, 2013, Aggie, the Toggenburg doe had one boy and one girl. The boy was a flaxen gold color, and was sold for a pet or meat. Dusty, the girl, is a light flaxen color, and is polled.
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Thomas and Dusty.
April 17, 2013, Millie, the Nubian mix doe gave birth to twin boys. One boy is a medium gold color and has gone to live with our friend Meagan, and the other is a black and white cou blanc pattern with floppy ears. He is available for a pet/meat home.
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Calvin, the Guernsey, Nubian, Alpine mix
Sheep
March 27, 2013, Michelle, the East Frisian ewe had two ram lambs by our Katahdin ram, Cranston. They are both white, and are growing rapidly.
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Twin ram lambs. Katahdin x Friesian
March 31 (Easter) 2013, Maggie the Katahdin had triplets, sired by Marvin, the East Friesian ram. One boy and one girl (Wanda) are being raised by Maggie, and the other girl (Wendy) is being bottle fed, as she was rejected by her mom.
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Boy and Wanda, Friesian x Katahdin lambs
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Wendy, the bottle lamb. Friesian x Katahdin
April 3, 2013, Aster the Icelandic ewe had twin boys from Marvin, the Frisian ram. They are very fast growers, and are already looking delicious.
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Aster with her boys. Friesian x Icelandic.
April 13, 2013, Coco, the Icelandic ewe had 2 ram lambs from Cranston, the Katahdin ram. It will be hard to eat them, they’re so cute.
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Katahdin x Icelandic ram lamb.
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Katahdin x Icelandic ram lamb
We have a few more does due to kid in June, and will update this list as babies are born. The pure Guernsey boys are for sale. The ram lambs could also be for sale if they are of interest to anyone, but will most likely be finished in our pastures and sold as meat this autumn. All girls, both lambs and kids, will be kept for breeding purposes. A few older does may be available this autumn.
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