Diamond Tooth Taxidermy

Exquisite Taxidermy Art and Design

© 2013 Diamond Tooth Taxidermy
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About Beth Beverly


I am a State and Federally licensed taxidermist who graduated from the Pocono Institute of Taxidermy in 2010 with high marks. I have a deep respect for this craft and those who strive to preserve it.

It is my pleasure to work on any trophy mount, be it a shoulder, life-size, rug, or fish.

I accept custom orders for fantasy mounts, wearables, and bridal hair pieces.

Sculptural mounts and hats are available for rental provided they are in stock at time of inquiry.

Contact me describing your wish and I will be delighted to make it so.


Diamond Tooth Taxidermy Blog:



Just the Skull, Please

Meet Z the Pitbull.  His humans had planned ahead as he was sick for some time, and brought him straight to me from the vet after euthanizing.  They just wanted the skull cleaned and articulated, the rest was up to me. 
Aside from burying skulls to let nature do the job, my experience in this department is limited to smaller creatures like rabbits and pheasants.  This was a more labor intensive job than I'd anticipated but nothing too difficult.  It really doesn't take any specific skill set to clean a skull, just a willingness to scoop brains out and get your fingernails really dirty underneath.


 After cleaning off as much muscle tissue and flesh as I could with a scalpel and my bare hands, I scooped the brain out with a fondue fork (also doubles as a rabbit ear splitter and cocktail stirrer when I'm in a pinch) and then boiled it for an hour to get the rest of the little bits to loosen up out of their crevices.


Round 2: Getting the rest of the little bits of (now boiled) brain out of the skull cavity,  You can see the bits and bobs in the photos above.  Everything must come out or, come Summertime, the client will have a very unpleasant surprise when flies start dropping their larva off at Camp Doggie Skull.



 There was still some stubborn matter hiding deep in the brain cavity so I reboiled, carefully (too much boiling can crack the bones, and if there is still oil and flesh on the bones it will soak into it, making it greasy.
 After the second boil I cleaned him off with a wire brush and used a needle to pick any little bits of anything hiding between those very serious looking teeth.

 After the last picking and poking, I soaked it in a bleach bath.  Bleach is not recommended for skulls, typically, unless its hair bleach.  I find that a very light mixture (1pt bleach to 10 or 12 pts water) works just fine for a finish and sanitation purposes.  Just keep your eye on it, take the skull out every 15 minutes or so to check progress. 





 Lastly, I drilled holes where the lower jaw met with the skull and articulated it with steel wire.  I left it long enough so that some movement would be possible.
 




Z's human came to get his skull last night and she was quite pleased.  I think this is a thoughtful and palatable option for pet preservation when having your whole buddy mounted just isn't a good fit.



REPOST: JOINED EARRINGS-HOT IN THE SUMMER


I'm reposting this not so old entry about my joined bone earrings in light of some recent heat they've been getting on the streets.  I particular enjoy wearing my long fringe and joined earrings in the Summer months when their not hindered by turtlenecks, jackets and scarves, so you can imagine how much mileage I'm getting out of my personal pairs these days.  It feels tremendous to have the wind whisp them about as I bike through town.  Or sit in a plane watching Bridemaids.  In fact, the last plane I was on was en route back form Rome and the flight attendant complimented the pair I was wearing.  I slipped her a business card and imagine my surpsie when I got home, checked my email and saw an inquiry from her on my website!  Turns out she's a bowhunter (hunts bears and uses every part, a gal after my own heart) with a budding taidermist for a daughter!  She purchased a pair for her gal's upcoming birthday and now I have a new pen pal!  I love serenditpitous meetings like this.
So, who knows what kind of magical meeting you might have wearing these.  They're certainly conversation pieces to say the least.  And GREAT for nervous fidgeting.

 

 

Keep your skull and jaws close to your skull and jaws.

This is a short and sweet little post featuring four new pairs of joined earrings (also known as “continuous earrings”, “earclaces” and “necklings”- I’ve been making these for 10+ years and have yet to find a way to properly market them for lack of a better name).
These earrings are surprisingly easy and fun to wear; they’re lighter than they look and give the wearer something to fiddle with, talk about or just enjoy the movement of.
I struggle to find a tag or reference name to go with pieces like this, as bone art is not actually taxidermy.  The term “osteopathicraft” was recently suggested to me but it’s a bit of a mouthful so I’m going to go with “Osteocraft” for now.  If you can com up with something better, please tell me your ideas in the comments!
First up: Rat Skull filigree earrings joined by black silk fringe:

The skull and fringe are both pleasantly lightweight and easy on the lobes.


Next: Pearlized Grey Fox jawbones earrings joined by a double strand of pearl beaded chain.  These are just a tad heavier than the rat skull earrings but completely wearable nonetheless.

I painted a pearlescent paint on the jaw and left a stripe untouched, just for fun:

Thirdly, we have a pair of pearlized grey fox jaw bone earrings with filigree detail  joined by white silk fringe:

Last but not least, Pearlized Grey Fox jaw bone earrings joined by a single strand of pearl beaded chain, with added chain and pearl detail:

Ding-a-ling-a-ling!

I am constantly producing these so if you want something you’re not seeing please contact me for a custom order.  Otherwise, get yourself to Wilbur Vintage ASAP and scoop up a pair!

BONE ZONE

Please enjoy these shadowy and spooky pictures I took with my untrained eye and hand of this dog baculum necklace.  It was a rainy day and I was too depressed to turn on any lights, really.  I do think the occulty vibe really translates though. 



This is a dog penis bone that I embellished with a swarovski crystal and matched with assorted vintage necklace parts to make a new piece.  A client purchased it; I have yet to hear any reviews.  I hope its bringing her beaucoup bon juju.
There's really not much else to say about dog dick charms.  I love them, maybe you do to.
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